The Philips Building by Denys Lasdun – home of SOAS Library

By Katie Price|May 27, 2015|1970s, Uncategorized, What SOAS means to you|0 comments

This week, Andy Davies talks about the distinctive home of the world-renowned SOAS Library and explains why the building should be given greater recognition.  Denys Lasdun (1914-2001) was in the vanguard of modern British architecture.  A product of the Architectural Association, his talents grew under Wells Coates and at Tecton in the 1930s.  Perhaps most celebrated for his Royal College of Physicians (completed in 1964), his University of East Anglia

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What SOAS means to me: An interview with alum, Johnnie Carson

By |April 17, 2015|1970s, Leading voices, SOAS in the world, What SOAS means to you|0 comments

Johnnie Carson is a diplomat and Senior Advisor to the US President. He graduated from SOAS with a BA International Studies in 1976. Here, he shares his experiences of his time at SOAS and his aspirations for the School’s future. Read the stories and memories of alumni from the1970s and other decades by visiting the alumni pages on the SOAS website. Why did you choose SOAS as the place to

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The generation game: Interview with alum, Asad Zaidi

By |March 26, 2015|1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2010s, Leading voices, SOAS in the world, The World at SOAS, Uncategorized, What SOAS means to you|0 comments

This week, Asad Zaidi shares his thoughts on what SOAS means to him.  Asad has followed in the footsteps of his grandfather, Dr Zawar Zaidi, who studied and lectured at the School before becoming a world authority on South Asia.   How did you discover SOAS? I first arrived to study at SOAS in 2012 for my masters, but I had already heard of the School from my grandfather. He

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The role of SOAS in 178 Years of Chinese Studies in the UK

By |February 13, 2015|1910s, 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1970s, SOAS in the world, The World at SOAS, Uncategorized, Women at SOAS|0 comments

Exactly 178 years ago, in 1837, the University of London established the UK’s first-ever professorship for Chinese, heralding the founding of Chinese Studies in this country. The Chair of Chinese is linked to a collection of Chinese books donated to the University in 1834 by the missionary Robert Morrison. The “Morrison collection” lay at the basis of what is now one of Europe’s largest collections of Chinese books, held at the

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From Finsbury Circus to Senate House

By |January 30, 2015|1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s|0 comments

SOAS, University of London was founded as the School of Oriental Studies in 1917 and was based at Finsbury Circus. In 1938 it officially became the School of Oriental and African Studies and was based in Vandon House, St James’ Park. The School then moved temporarily to Cambridge during the Second World War. With next year’s opening of Senate House North Block due to usher in a new era, images

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