British Library “Two Centuries of Indian Print” South Asian Seminars podcast

By Galia Umansky|December 19, 2018|Uncategorized|0 comments

Pam Sehmi Monday 3rd December 2018 marked the last of our current series of South Asia Seminars – which have been successfully running since November 2016. These exciting and varied talks have revolved around the British Library’s South Asia collection as well as the ‘Two Centuries of Indian Print’ digitisation project. The free talks at the British Library have created a great platform for researchers, from the UK and overseas,

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Islam and Print in South Asia Workshop at the British Library – Part Two

By Galia Umansky|October 16, 2018|Uncategorized|0 comments

Alia Carter The Two Centuries of Indian Print project is proud to host the second part of a two part workshop being held at the British Library on “Islam and Print in South Asia”. Part Two will be on Friday 26th October. The emergence of print in South Asia has been understood as a transformative moment for Islam in the Subcontinent, heralding a period of revival and reform from the

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The Two Centuries of Indian Print ‘South Asia’ Series at the British Library – Summer 2018

By Galia Umansky|June 13, 2018|Uncategorized|0 comments

Priyanka Basu The ‘Two Centuries of Indian Print’ Project’ is pleased to announce an exciting line-up of talks at the British Library during June – September 2018, featuring a diverse array of subjects such as contemporary Islamic sermons in Bangladesh, territory in colonial India, housing question in colonial Delhi, Qur’an translations into Bangla, history of the P.E.N. in India, Manipuri dance, the Indian dancer Ram Gopal, Deccani scroll paintings and

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Nineteenth Century Bengali Farces and the Comic Tradition

By Galia Umansky|May 24, 2018|Uncategorized|0 comments

Priyanka Basu A farce has often been deemed as a genre not complete in itself, but more in the form of appending a comic representation. Farces have been considered ‘lower’ in status to ‘high comedy’ primarily due to the excess of the comic body in performance and the inherent absurdities in dialogue. In 19th century Calcutta, farces—better known as prahasana—found a prolific expression both in print and on-stage. Proscenium stage

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