Factory work, gender and structural adjustment in Monastir, Tunisia

By 643577|March 8, 2019|Labour, Neoliberalism|0 comments

This post is written by Kira Brenner, Doctoral Researcher in the Department of Development Studies at SOAS.  In July of 2018, I met a group of women who had been occupying their former factory for six months, located in an industrial area outside of the tourist city of Monastir, on the central coast of Tunisia. The factory closed in December, and their sit-in began immediately after. They have suffered numerous

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Migrants granted bail left trapped in British immigration detention because of nowhere to go

By 643577|March 7, 2019|Immigration dentention, Migration|0 comments

This post is written by Anna Lindley, Senior Lecturer in Migration, Mobility and Development at SOAS, and Clara Della Croce, Senior Teaching Fellow in the School of Law at SOAS. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons License. Read the original article.  Britain’s already Kafkaesque immigration detention system has reached new heights as it’s become clear that migrants who’ve successfully challenged their immigration detention are remaining incarcerated,

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The march out of the sweatshop: on work and life after the garment factory

By 643577|March 1, 2019|Labour|0 comments

This post is written by Alessandra Mezzadri, Senior Lecturer in Development Studies at SOAS and author of The Sweatshop Regime (CUP, 2017). When it comes to the fate of sweatshop workers worldwide, one of the most under-researched areas of concern is what happens to them upon leaving the sweatshop. We know all about the poor wages they get, their little access to social contributions, and their great exposure to occupational health

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Hunter and Prey in a Mauritanian Café

By 643577|January 17, 2019|Borders, Doctoral Research at SOAS, Migration|0 comments

This post is written by Hassan Ould Moctar, Doctoral Researcher and Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Department of Development Studies at SOAS. One evening while sitting in a café in the northern Mauritanian port city of Nouadhibou, I was unexpectedly joined by a member of the Spanish Guardia Civil and a companion of his. I was on a research trip to Nouadhibou and had been introduced to the Guardia Civil officer

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The Bernstein & Byres Prize in Agrarian Change for 2017

By 643577|September 17, 2018|Journal of Agrarian Change, Social movements|0 comments

This post is written by Liam Campling, Cristóbal Kay, Jens Lerche, Bridget O’Laughlin, and Carlos Oya. It is part of the Journal of Agrarian Change blog, hosted on the Development Studies at SOAS blog. We are pleased to announce that R. Ramakumar, School of Development Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, has been awarded the 2017 Bernstein & Byres Prize for his article ‘Jats, Khaps and Riots: Communal Politics and the

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Food, Myself, and Refugees

By 643577|November 13, 2017|Migration, Uncategorized|2 comments

This post is written by Paolo Novak. Paolo is conducting research on asylum seekers’ reception in Italy, funded by the British Academy/Leverhume Small Grant SG162483. I love food, as all those who know me, or perhaps just see me, can confirm. I love the full spectrum sensorial satisfaction it provides, and the social life that defines each plate and accompanies its consumption. It is perhaps not surprising, then, that food has

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Book review of Nandini Sundar’s The Burning Forest

By Safa Joudeh|August 17, 2017|Conflict, Democracy, Forced displacement, Journal of Agrarian Change, Neoliberalism, Political ecology, State in development|0 comments

This post is written by Christian Lund who is Professor of Development, Resource Management, and Governance, at the Department of Food and Resource Economics, at Copenhagen University. It is part of the Journal of Agrarian Change blog, hosted on the Development Studies at SOAS blog. The Burning Forest. India’s War in Bastar, by Nandini Sundar. Delhi: Juggernaut, 2016. Pp. 413+xvi. ₹ (Indian Rupees) 699 (cloth). ISBN 978-93-8622-800-0. Terror is at the heart

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The Bernstein and Byres Prize in Agrarian Change for 2016

By Jo Tomkinson|July 8, 2017|Agriculture, Journal of Agrarian Change, Labour|0 comments

This post has been jointly written by the editors of the Journal of Agrarian Change: Liam Campling, Cristóbal Kay, Jens Lerche, and Carlos Oya. It is part of the Journal of Agrarian Change blog, hosted on the Development Studies at SOAS blog. The ‘Bernstein & Byres Prize’ has been awarded since 2008 by the Journal of Agrarian Change (JAC) to the best article published in that year. An award of £500 is

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Using Literary Comics to Understand the Role of Borderland Brokers in Post-War Transitions

By Jo Tomkinson|July 3, 2017|Borders, Conflict, Migration, Peace, State in development|0 comments

This post is written by Jonathan Goodhand, Professor in Conflict and Development Studies in the Department of Development Studies at SOAS, and Oliver Walton, Lecturer in International Development, University of Bath.  “It is true that Hambantota is the periphery and is in need of development. However, we should not blame people (from the centre). We must portray the periphery as a partner. Not as a hotbed of resistance”. The quotation

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Book Review of Bina Agarwal’s Gender Challenges

By Jo Tomkinson|June 28, 2017|Agriculture, Journal of Agrarian Change, Political ecology, State in development, Women's rights|0 comments

This post is written by Haroon Akram-Lodhi who is Professor in the Department of International Development Studies, Trent University, Ontario. It is part of the Journal of Agrarian Change blog, hosted on the Development Studies at SOAS blog. Gender Challenges, Volume 1: Agriculture, Technology, and Food Security, by Bina Agarwal. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 400+xxiii. US$235 / Rs. 6595 (3-volume set, pb.). ISBN: 978-0-19-809982-6. Gender Challenges, Volume 2: Property,

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