Opening up your research: a guide to self-archiving

By David Pearson|September 1, 2014|Anthropology and Sociology, Art and Archaeology, China and Inner Asia, Development Studies, Financial and Management Studies, Gender, History, Information Literacy, Japan, Korea, Law, Linguistics, Literature, Middle East, Central Asia & Islamica, Music, Media and Film Studies, Politics and International Relations, Religions, South Asia, South East Asia, Unknown|0 comments

Making your research available on open access services increases citation and helps ensure greater impact, argues Deborah Lupton. In this post she has advice for sociologists in particular on different ways to self-archive, formatting and how to overcome barriers such as complex copyright legislation.

Read the full article here.

Deborah Lupton is a Professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Sydney. She blogs at This Sociological Life and tweets @DALupton and is currently writing a book on digital sociology for Routledge.

 

Some of this content is reposted from Deborah Lupton’s article [linked to above] under this Creative Commons license:

Creative Commons Licence

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