Project Highlight: Ayoreo Publication

During 2016, within the frame of the documentation project IGS0205, a book was published and distributed between the Ayoreo communities in Paraguay and Bolivia. The work in question is a bilingual story book (Ayoreo-Spanish) that features 19 tales of cultural relevance, most of them set before contact with non-aboriginal groups. This publication is intended to help preserve the narratives of a now elderly group who lived half their lives before contact, and share their knowledge with younger and future generations. It is also intended as a way of sharing the project’s data with the speech community. This book was co-edited by the lead researcher Santiago Durante and the main consultant and Secretary of the community of Campo Loro Benito Etacore. It was financed by the ELDP and published by FILO:UBA (publishing house of the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters, University of Buenos Aires).

On 14th November 2016, two members of the Ayoreo community of Campo Loro, Paraguay, came to Buenos Aires, Argentina, in order to introduce the book in the Faculty of Letters and Philosophy at the University of Buenos Aires. The visitors were Benito Etacore, co-editor, and Pablo Etacore, who is author of one of the stories.

Before the presentation, Benito and Pablo talked with the students of an Ethnolinguistics class at the university. It was a very interesting exchange for both the visitors and the public. The students (most Linguistics and Anthropology majors) had a chance to talk to Benito and Pablo and even did an exercise on number elicitation.

The book presentation attracted a large audience and was held by a panel composed of the Director of the Career Miguel Vedda, the sub-secretary of publications Matías Cordo, the head professor of Ethnolinguistics, Lucía Golluscio, Amadeo Benz from the Paraguayan Ministry of Education, Benito Etacore (co-editor of the book), Pablo Etacore (author of one of the stories) and Santiago Durante (co-editor and lead researcher on the documentation project).

It was the first time Ayoreo members visited Buenos Aires and it was a great opportunity to share knowledge about this Chaco group with the local academic community. It was also a good opportunity for the main consultants to visit the workplace of the linguist involved in the documentation project they have been working on for the last three years.

To learn more about this documentation project and the Ayoreo language, visit the ELAR catalogue here.

 

FLEx Tips for New Language Documenters

FieldWorks Language Explorer (FLEx) is a program that has built upon previous software designed for documentary linguists (perhaps some of you remember ToolBox)? As a result, FLEx is a very useful and powerful lexicon building tool. For those of you who have found our beloved FLEx but need a few hints to get you started, hopefully these tips will be helpful!

  1. NEW LISTS ARE AUTOMATICALLY CREATED FOR YOU

If your texts are being imported from other software (such as ELAN), a new text will automatically be generated in the Texts and Words section of FLEx.

You cannot create a new text, and then try an import an outside file into that newly created text. Instead, you’ll end up with two newly created lists, one with text from the imported file, and one empty.

2. CHANGE THE BASELINE LANGUAGE

If you’ve imported or created texts, but then are frustratingly prevented from annotating them, it may be because you haven’t changed the language of the baseline text. If the language of the baseline text is the same as the language of annotation, you won’t be able to analyze the text. (This will happen if you are annotating in English and your Baseline language is also English, for example). To change this, go to the baseline and highlight the whole text. Then, in the upper middle area of the tool bar, choose the new baseline language from the dropdown menu.

3. NEW DEFINITION VS. NEW SENSE

This one I found out the hard way. Yes, there are significant differences between a new definition and a new sense of a word – at least in terms of how FLEx interprets them in the future. A new ‘sense’ of a word will be displayed in the same lexical entry while a new ‘definition’ will appear as its own entry in the lexicon. This is useful for distinguishing between polysemy and homophony, for instance. It seems trivial but it’s important to get it right the first time as it is difficult and time-consuming to alter later.

4. INSERT NOTES

Something I also didn’t realize at first is that you can add notes to your sentences in the Analzye tab. Do this by either CONTROL + N or by right-hand clicking the Insert Note button at the top right of the tool bar. Notes can be useful to remember important things and if you have certain ways you want to tag the sentences, you can insert the tag in the note tier and search only the note tier with the search engine in Concordance later.

5. SEARCHING

There are several ways to search for things in FLEx. The one I find most useful is searching in Concordance which you can access in Words & Texts. This is helpful if you need to find multiple instances of the same word or morpheme for instance.

As you can see from the picture, above, you have the ability to search different tiers with several methods (we will ignore ‘use regular expressions’ for now). For example, you can search via the ‘whole word’, ‘at end’/’at start’, and ‘anywhere’. Searching for the ‘whole word’ means that there is a space before and after the string of characters in the text. Searching ‘at end’/’at start’ searches for characters either preceded or followed by other characters (which can be useful when searching for pre- or suffixes). Finally, ‘anywhere’ means that the search engine will search for the string of characters anywhere (but be careful, a particular string might not always manifest as one word or phrase. The engine will not be searching for one ‘word’- it will indiscriminately search for that string of characters across boundaries).

6. FLEX SAVES AUTOMATICALLY

Finally, just in case you’ve been desperately searching for a way to save your work in FLEx, fret not! Perhaps one of the most convenient things about FLEx is that your work is automatically saved. It is always a good idea, however, to have your work saved in multiple places. If the only place your FLEx database is recorded is your own computer, consider using a website such as LanguageDepot to save and share your corpus with colleagues or an external hard drive – just to make sure your data are saved multiple places.

What other tips do you have for our FLEx users? Please share them in the comments section below and help spread the knowledge!

By Sarah Dopierala

Community Member Bio: Jean Paul Kendele, Jacob Kedjewe, Isaac Ngoleng & Esaie Tahbai, Tchouvok community (Cameroon) Part Two

This week on the ELAR blog, ELDP grantee Dadak Ndokobai interviews four language consultants who are working with him to document the Cuvok language in Cameroon.

Interview de Kendele Jean Paul

Peux-tu brièvement parler de toi et de ta langue?

« Je suis né à Tchouvok et je m’appelle Kendele Jean Paul. J’ai 37 ans  marié et père de 6 enfants. Je suis forgeron et ma mère est la sagefemme du village qui fait accoucher les femmes enceintes.  J’ai arrêté les études très tôt faute des moyens financiers. J’aime ma langue maternelle et je suis moniteur d’alphabétisation je suis l’un des consultants qui travaillent beaucoup avec le linguiste pour l’aide dans l’analyse des données récoltées »

Est-ce que votre langue est encore parlée par tout le monde dans la communauté?

« Ma langue le cuvok est parlée dans ma communauté même si certaines personnes commencent à mélanger avec le fulfulde qi domine dans la région comme langue de communication »

Comment est-ce que ce projet de documentation de ta langue a commencé?

« Le projet a commencé en  2014 quand le linguiste Ndokobai Dadak est et a choisi des personnes pour l’aider dans le travail. Puis il nous a formé pour filmer, enregistrer, utiliser l’ordinateur. En linguistique, j’ai appris comment faire la traduction, récolter les mots, entrer les vocabulaires dans le dictionnaire. J’ai aussi été formé en alphabétisation comme moniteur pour enseigner les gens qui veulent lire et écrire en langue. Avant de commencer le travail nous avons discuté de notre compensation qui est faite par heure de travail et je peux aider ma famille»

Peux-tu nous parler des personnes qui travaillent dans le projet

«Tout le village est très content du projet et presque tout le monde contribue d’une manière ou d’une autre à son fonctionnement.  Pour nous qui se retrouver chaque matin pour travailler avec le linguiste, nous sommes payés par heure de travail et nous sommes plus d’une dizaine : Ndokobai Dadak, Ngecmey, Tahbai Esaie, Kedjewe Jacob, Tahbai pierre, Ngoleng, Kabai Robert, Abdou Nasoudam, Mtsila , Kendele Jean Paul, Kamtsafa Meverkede, Kebehey Maslamta, Dabla Kebehey, Ltouteved Ezechiel, Kawake paul, Kusek Kezelmey. Nous sommes tous des personnes de Tchouvok mélangés entre forgerons et les non-forgerons.»

Quel type de formation avez –vous reçu en linguistique et dans le domaine de la documentation linguistique?

« J’ai été formé comme assistant de linguiste dans le domaine de film, d’enregistrement. Je suis aussi formé pour aider le linguiste dans le dépouillement des données obtenues. J’acquis des compétences dans le domaine linguiste pour faire entrer les mots dans le lexique, chercher les mots pour mieux décrire les activités des forgerons qui travaillent dans la forge, comme sage-femme ou comme croque-mort. Je suis moniteur dans les classes d’alphabétisation. »

Que penses-tu de ce projet?

« Je pense que  ce projet est le début de développement de notre langue et de notre communauté qui est restée longtemps dans le sous-développement. Sur le plan personnel le projet m’a donné du travail pour nourrir ma famille. »

Quel impact croyez-vous que ce projet va avoir / a eu sur la communauté?

« Ce projet a permis aux frères qui n’ont pas été à l’école de bénéficier des classes d’alphabétisation faites par les bénévoles que nous sommes. Apres notre travail avec le linguiste, nous consacrons notre soirée à leur enseigner comment lire et écrire en cuvok. Ce projet a permis à certaines personnes qui n’ont jamais vu l’électricité de la découvrir à travers le groupe électrogène que le projet a acheté pour notre travail. Le projet a donc un impact positif sur la communauté.»

Quel est votre mot ou phrase favori dans votre langue et pourquoi?

« Mon mot favori est  [sagam]   «nom du pot sacrificiel ». Ceci est important pour moi parce qu’avant la documentation sur le rôle des forgerons je ne savais pas ce que c’est mais maintenant je peux bien l’expliquer aux autres.  Le [sagam] permet de maintenir la relation entre les vivants et nos ancêtres qui sont dans le monde spirituel. »

Quelle a été la meilleure chose à propos de votre implication dans le projet d’ELDP?

« Ma formation est en utilisation de l’ordinateur est très important pour moi. Si jamais ce projet finit et qu’un autre projet arrive chez nous, je suis certain que je pourrai être employé. La compensation que je reçois me permet de payer l’école de mes enfants »

Quels sont vos espoirs pour le devenir de votre langue

« Mon espoir est que notre langue soit bien étudiée et que nos enfants qui commencent à mélanger la langue avec les autres langues arrivent bien lire et écrire le cuvok »

 

Interview de Kedjewe Jacob

Peux-tu brièvement parler de toi et de ta langue?

« Né à Tchouvok, je m’appelle Kedjewe Jacob. Je suis né en 1971,  marié et père de 7 enfants. Je suis allé à l’école juste pendant 4 années et les conditions de la vie m’ont obligé à abandonner les études. Ma langue, je la parle bien et je voudrais qu’elle soit bien gardée»

Est-ce que votre langue est encore parlée par tout le monde dans la communauté?

« Presque tout le monde parle bien la langue mais pour trouver ceux qui parlent bien la langue il faut aller dans les quartiers comme ceux de Balyak et Meklek. Dans les autres quartiers, les gens mélangent la langue avec d’autres langues à cause de la proximité avec les autres peuples qui parlent des langues dominantes comme le Mafa, le fulfuldé »

Comment est-ce que ce projet de documentation de ta langue a commencé?

« Le projet a commencé en 2014 avec la formation des consultants que nous sommes. Le linguiste nous a expliqué le travail et nous avons accepté de travailler avec lui pour mieux l’aider dans la documentation de notre langue et culture»

Peux-tu nous parler des personnes qui travaillent dans le projet

«Beaucoup de personnes travaillent dans ce projet : Ndokobai Dadak,  Ltouteved Ezechiel, Tahbai pierre, Ngecmey, Ngoleng, Kabai Robert, Abdou Nasoudam, Mtsila , Kendele Jean Paul, Kamtsafa Meverkede, Kebehey Maslamta, Dabla Kebehey, Kusek Kezelmey, Tahbai Esaie , Kawake paul. Pour mieux l’aider dans le travail, il a choisi les personnes qui sont forgerons et d’autres qui sont des non forgerons. Tout le monde travaille bien et nous sommes content que de progrès est fait dans le travail.»

Quel type de formation avez –vous reçu en linguistique et dans le domaine de la documentation linguistique?

« En linguistique ma formation a consisté en la collectes des données, dépouillement, la connaissance des sur la grammaire, l’orthographe et alphabétisation. Faire de vidéo et guider le chercheur principal lors de nos descentes sur le terrain pour faire des enregistrements. »

Que penses-tu de ce projet?

« Au début je pensais à une blague car je n’ai pas de grandes études, mais maintenant je trouve ce projet autrement. J’arrive à contribuer et je peux déjà bien lire et écrire. Avant je pensais que ceux qui utilisent l’ordinateur sont des « sorciers », mais aujourd’hui moi je peux aussi travailler cet appareil.

Quel impact croyez-vous que ce projet va avoir / a eu sur la communauté?

« L’impact positif de ce projet c’est d’avoir permis à beaucoup de personnes au village de gagner leur pain quotidien en leur donnant un travail temporaire. C’est aussi le fait d’avoir permis à ceux qui étaient analphabètes de pouvoir lire et écrire. Je suis le fruit de l’impact positif de ce projet notre grand problème aujourd’hui c’est le manque d’eau dans notre village. Si ce projet pouvait nous aider à réaliser de points d’eau nous serions davantage reconnaissants. Le projet permet aussi de sensibiliser les gens de villages pour envoyer les enfants et surtout les jeunes filles à l’école. Nous observons déjà au village quelques filles qui vont à l’école.»

Quel est votre mot ou phrase favori dans votre langue et pourquoi?

« Mon mot favori est  [ɗaf]   «boule de mil ».le [ɗaf] est notre principal repas et il est consommé chaque jour dans le village. Il est fait à baisse de la farine de mil. C’est mon mot favori car c’est grâce à cela que je suis vivant. Dans notre village il n’y a pas de variété dans notre façon de nous nourrir. Nous mangeons le [ɗaf] à chaque repas.  »

Quelle a été la meilleure chose à propos de votre implication dans le projet d’ELDP?

« Savoir lire et écrire en langue maternelle est ma meilleure depuis que je suis dans le projet d’ELDP.»

Quels sont vos espoirs pour le devenir de votre langue

« Si Dieu le permet je voudrais que tout le monde parvient à bien lire et écrire le cuvok. Mon espoir c’est l’étude de la langue qui est en train d’être fait puisse nous aider à nous développer et nous sortir de l’analphabétisme »

Kadama, a language consultant, showing a spiritual pot representing the spirit of a deceased person

Interview de Ngoleng Isaac

Peux-tu brièvement parler de toi et de ta langue?

«Moi  je m’appelle Ngoleng Iaac. Je suis né en 1974 et Je ne suis jamais allé à l’école. J’ai seulement appris à lire et à ecrire dans les classes d’alphabétisation en fulfulde et lorsque le projet sur le cuvok est venu j’ai appris à lire et à écrire le cuvok. Aujourd’hui je suis moniteur. Je suis marié et père de 4 enfants.»

Est-ce que votre langue est encore parlée par tout le monde dans la communauté?

« Oui les gens parlent le cuvok dans ma communauté mais certaines personnes ne parlent pas bien. »

Comment est-ce que ce projet de documentation de ta langue a commencé?

« Le projet a commencé par la formation des consultants que nous sommes. Je me rappelle c’est en 2014, lorsque Ndokobai Dadak est venu nous avons commencé le travail.»

Peux-tu nous parler des personnes qui travaillent dans le projet

«Nous travaillons en groupe et il y a beaucoup de travail dans le projet. Je travaille chaque jour avec  Ndokobai Dadak, Kedjewe Jacob,  Ltouteved Ezechiel, Tahbai pierre, Ngecmey, Kabai Robert, Abdou Nasoudam, Mtsila , Kendele Jean Paul, Kamtsafa Meverkede, Kebehey Maslamta, Dabla Kebehey, Kusek Kezelmey, Tahbai Esaie , Kawake paul.  Les autres comme moi sont très content d’aider dans ce projet.»

Quel type de formation avez –vous reçu en linguistique et dans le domaine de la documentation linguistique?

« Je suis formé pour trouver les mots et ajouter au lexique. Je connais un peu comment utiliser l’ordinateur et filmer avec les appareils photo. Ma connaissance du français est très limité et Ndokobai Dadak doit tout m’expliquer en fulfulde ou en cuvok pour comprendre, c’est pourquoi cela prend de temps pour apprendre »

Que penses-tu de ce projet?

« Je pense que ce projet est le bienvenu chez les Tchouvok il est en train de nous aider dans le domaine financier et de la connaissance de notre langue et culture. »

Quel impact croyez-vous que ce projet va avoir / a eu sur la communauté?

« Moi je peux lire et écrire déjà sans aller à l’école classique, donc je crois que le projet a un impact positif. A la fin du projet je crois que notre communauté aura une attitude positif envers notre langue.»

Quel est votre mot ou phrase favori dans votre langue et pourquoi?

« Mon mot favori est  [ɬàw], viande. La viande est très importante car dans notre village, manger la viande est synonyme de bonne vie. Il n’est pas possible de pouvoir manger la viande ici à tout moment. La possibilité de manger la viande s’offre à chaque ménage seulement une ou deux fois par an. »

Quelle a été la meilleure chose à propos de votre implication dans le projet d’ELDP?

« Lire et écrire en ma langue est la meilleure chose que j’ai eu depuis mon implication dans le projet d’ELDP »

Quels sont vos espoirs pour le devenir de votre langue

« J’espère que la langue cuvok sera étudiée à l’école un jour. »

A blacksmith in his forge teaching his son how to set a forge in order to work on metals to obtain hoes and sickles

Interview de Tahbai Esaie

Peux-tu brièvement parler de toi et de ta langue?

« Je m’appelle Tahbai Esaie et  J’ai 40 ans. Je suis né àTchouvok de clan Maryam, fils d’un forgeron.   Je suis marié et père de 6 enfants. J’ai abandonné les études au CM2 après la mort de mon père faute de pouvoir payer les frais scolaires.  Je suis moniteur pour la langue cuvok et je la parle bien »

Est-ce que votre langue est encore parlée par tout le monde dans la communauté ?

« La langue cuvok est parlée mais à certains endroits les gens mélangent avec le fulfulde »

Comment est-ce que ce projet de documentation de ta langue a commencé?

« Le projet a commencé lorsque Ndokobai Dadak est venu et nous a formé pour l’aider dans le travail. Lorsqu’il a expliqué qu’il s’agit de documenter notre langue nous avons accepté avec joie»

Peux-tu nous parler des personnes qui travaillent dans le projet

«je travaille dans ce projet en compagnie des autres personnes du village qui sont : Ndokobai Dadak, Kedjewe Jacob,  Ltouteved Ezechiel, Tahbai pierre, Ngecmey, Ngoleng, Kabai Robert, Abdou Nasoudam, Mtsila , Kendele Jean Paul, Kamtsafa Meverkede, Kebehey Maslamta, Dabla Kebehey, Kusek Kezelmey, Tahbai Esaie , Kawake paul. Tout le monde connait la langue et la culture du village. Nous sommes mélangés entre les forgerons et les non forgerons.»

Quel type de formation avez –vous reçu en linguistique et dans le domaine de la documentation linguistique?

« J’ai été formé pour transcrire les paroles dans les enregistrement. Je peux aussi filmer en audio et vidéos pour aider le linguiste lorsqu’il ne peut pas prendre part à la scène »

Que penses-tu de ce projet?

« Moi en tant que forgeron, je pense que le projet est très important dans la mesure où il va documenter les rôles des forgerons dans notre société. Le projet en faisant cette documentation va permettre la sauvegarde et la transmission de ces rôles-clés que jouent les forgerons dans notre communauté »

Quel impact croyez-vous que ce projet va avoir / a eu sur la communauté?

« Grâce à ce projet, même la manière de vivre au village a changé positivement beaucoup de personnes savent lire et ecrire.»

Quel est votre mot ou phrase favori dans votre langue et pourquoi?

« Mon mot favori est  [yàm]   «eau ». Le mot « yam »est très important pour moi l’eau c’est la vie et l’eau est très rare dans notre village. Je me lève très tôt le matin pour aller chercher l’eau à de kilomètres de mon village. »

Quelle a été la meilleure chose à propos de votre implication dans le projet d’ELDP?

« Lire et écrire en cuvok est mon grand bien depuis que je suis dans ce projet d’ELDP. »

Quels sont vos espoirs pour le devenir de votre langue

« Mon espoir c’est voir toute la communauté Tchouvok sortir de l’analphabétisme je souhaite que la langue ne puisse pas disparaitre faute de ceux qui pourront la parler. J’espère qu’avec la recherche en cours, elle sera utilisé dans nos écoles comme langue d’enseignement »

A blacksmith making pots in her workshop

Thank you, Dadak, Jean Paul, Jacob, Isaac, and Esaie! To learn more about this project and the Cuvok language, visit the ELAR catalogue at: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI663110

 

Community Member Bio: Pierre Tahbai, Ezechiel Ltouteved & Felix Amadou, Tchouvok community (Cameroon) Part One

This week on the ELAR blog, ELDP grantee Dadak Ndokobai interviews three language consultants who are working with him to document the Cuvok language in Cameroon. This blog post has been split into two parts; the second part will post next week on the ELAR blog.

Interview de Tahbai, Pierre

Peux-tu brièvement parler de toi et de ta langue?

« Je m’appelle Tahbai Pierre, consultant dans le projet de documentation de la langue Cuvok. Je suis né vers 1981 et je suis père de 7 enfants. Je suis né à Tchouvok et j’ai fait des études jusqu’en classe de 5e car je ne pouvais pas continuer faute de moyens et il n’y avait pas d’école secondaire dans mon village.  J’aime ma langue le cuvok et je la parle très bien. Je suis content du fait que la langue cuvok se développe et nous avons des documents écrits en notre langue aussi. »

Est-ce que votre langue est encore parlée par tout le monde dans la communauté?

« Les gens parlent la langue mais les jeunes d’aujourd’hui commencent à mélanger avec le français et surtout avec le fulfulde.  Dieu merci notre langue est de plus en plus développée et nous avons un système d’écriture. Nous pensons qu’avec les efforts de sensibilisation, les gens trouveront le moyen de parler notre langue. »

Comment est-ce que ce projet de documentation de ta langue a commencé ?

« Le projet a commencé en 2014 lorsque le linguiste Ndokobai Dadak est venu nous parler de la documentation de la langue cuvok et des rôles des forgerons. Au début nous ne comprenions pas ce qu’il voulait faire. Il a commencé par les réunions avec les gens au village et par la formation d’une dizaine de personnes qui sont devenues aujourd’hui les personnes clé du projet. »

Peux-tu nous parler des personnes qui travaillent dans le projet

« Il y a beaucoup de personnes avec qui nous travaillons dans le projet. Je peux citer de mémoire le linguiste Ndokobai Dadak, Kedjewe Jacob, Ltouteved Ezechiel, Tahbai pierre, Ngecmey, Ngoleng, Kabai Robert, Abdou Nasoudam, Mtsila , Kendele Jean Paul, Kamtsafa Meverkede, Kebehey Maslamta, Dabla Kebehey, Kusek Kezelmey, Tahbai Esaie , Kawake paul. Ils sont tous motivés et veulent voir leur langue développée ainsi que la documentation du rôle du forgeron qui est en danger à cause du modernisme et des contacts avec les autres peuples. Nous sommes bien organisés t bien formés par le linguiste pour l’assister dans le projet de documentation »

Quel type de formation avez –vous reçu en linguistique et dans le domaine de la documentation linguistique ?

« Moi j’ai reçu la formation sur la collecte des données pour faire le dictionnaire, le linguiste nous a aussi formé sur comment enregistrer en audio et vidéo. Ainsi lorsqu’il est occupé avec d’autres taches moi je fais les photos et les enregistrements. Nous avons aussi recu de formation sur la gestion de classe d’alphabétisation, comment rédiger un texte en langue maternelle. »

Que penses-tu de ce projet ?

« Je pense que ce projet est venu au moment indiqué. Je pense qu’il va transformer notre communauté car le système d’écriture et les brochures disponibles permettent déjà aux gens de lire et écrire en langue maternelle. Je pense aussi que le projet va beaucoup durer pour nous aider à développer notre village. »

Quel impact croyez-vous que ce projet va avoir / a eu sur la communauté?

« Ce projet a déjà beaucoup changé dans notre communauté. Avant ce projet, le rôle du forgeron n’était pas bien connu et tendait vers la disparition totale. Avec ce projet, nous qui travaillons avec le linguiste avons  beaucoup appris sur le rôle capital que joue le forgeron dans notre société.  Les classes d’alphabétisation sont organisées et il y a beaucoup de personnes qui peuvent lire et écrire en cuvok. Nous espérons que ce projet pourra durer et nous permettre de passer de la connaissance de notre langue à la langue française pour découvrir le monde. »

Quel est votre mot ou phrase favori dans votre langue et pourquoi ?

 « L’expression qui est favorite pour moi est [mándzàh fá ɬàm ánà]   «  la vie en commune». J’aime cette expression car la vie vécue ensemble apporte beaucoup en ce sens cela favorise l’apprentissage. J’ai expérimenté cela dans le cadre de ce projet. »

Quelle a été la meilleure chose à propos de votre implication dans le projet d’ELDP ?

« Beaucoup de choses m’ont plu depuis que je suis impliqué dans ce projet d’ELPD : l’étude de la langue, découverte de certains aspects de ma culture.  Sur le plan personnel, il y a l’aspect financier qui a permis de résoudre beaucoup de mes problèmes. Avec l’argent du projet que je reçois j’arrive à envoyer mes enfants à l’école. Le projet est un grand soulagement et je prie que ce projet continue encore pour aider dans le village car ici nous n’avons pas d’emploi pour gagner notre pain. »

Quels sont vos espoirs pour le devenir de votre langue

« J’espère que la langue cuvok va se développer et jouer un rôle dans la communication comme les autres langues qui sont autour de nous. J’espère pouvoir avoir la grammaire dans notre langue très bien quand le linguiste va finir son travail. Nous espérons avoir d’autres projets pour définitivement développer notre langue. »

Mtsila, one the oldest Tchouvok blacksmiths, using the mathematical language for divination

Interview de Ltouteved, Ezechiel

Peux-tu brièvement parler de toi et de ta langue?

« Je suis Ltouteved Ezechiel , consultant dans le projet de documentation de la langue Cuvok. J’aide le linguiste Ndokobai Dadak dans le projet. Je suis né vers 1976 et je suis père de 4 enfants. Je suis né à Tchouvok et j’ai fait des études jusqu’en classe de 6e  et j’ai arrêté les études fautes des moyens financiers.  Je suis content de parler ma langue maternelle et je suis mecontent quand je vois comment les enfants ne parlent plus bien la langue. »

Est-ce que votre langue est encore parlée par tout le monde dans la communauté?

« Notre  langue est encore parlée par certaines personnes d’autres personnes parlent beaucoup plus le fulfulde car ils veulent communiquer avec les Mafa et les Mofu qui sont autour de notre village. »

Comment est-ce que ce projet de documentation de ta langue a commencé?

« Le projet a commencé en août 2014 quand le linguiste Ndokobai Dadak est venu nous parler d’un projet. Au début nous pensions au projet de réparation de route ou d’adduction d’eau, mais après il nous expliqué lors de la première réunion qu’il s’agissait de développer notre langue et notre culture. Nous avons accepté cela avec joie.  Après il nous a formé pour l’aider dans le travail. »

Peux-tu nous parler des personnes qui travaillent dans le projet

«Pour ce projet, il y a beaucoup des gens qui apportent leur contribution, mais je peux citer les personnes qui travaillent chaque avec le linguiste pour la documentation. Il y a le linguiste Ndokobai Dadak, Kedjewe Jacob, Tahbai Esaie, moi-même  Ltouteved Ezechiel, Tahbai pierre, Ngecmey, Ngoleng, Kabai Robert, Abdou Nasoudam, Mtsila , Kendele Jean Paul, Kamtsafa Meverkede, Kebehey Maslamta, Dabla Kebehey, Kusek Kezelmey, , Kawake Paul. Nous vivons tous au village et nous sommes contents de travailler pour notre langue. Kendele jeanPaul et moi Ltouteved avons reçu une bonne formation qui nous permet de travailler avec le linguiste même à Maroua. »

Quel type de formation avez –vous reçu en linguistique et dans le domaine de la documentation linguistique?

« J’ai été formé pour aider le linguiste dans la récolte des données qui sont les mots, les phrases et mes des textes, dans la transcription. Le linguiste m’a formé pour utiliser les appareils pour enregistrer et filmer. Je sais déjà aussi lire et écrire ma langue. Je suis moniteur dans les classes d’alphabétisation. »

Que penses-tu de ce projet?

« Je pense que  le projet Tchouvok est un bon projet. Le projet nous aide beaucoup dans le domaine financier et permet aussi le développement de notre langue. »

Quel impact croyez-vous que ce projet va avoir / a eu sur la communauté?

 « Le projet a apporté les classes d’alphabétisation dans notre village et beaucoup de gens savent déjà lire et écrire. Comme nous sommes dans une zone à faible éducation, le projet va beaucoup aider les gens du village pour apprendre la lecture. Si ce projet dure encore un peu, le village Tchouvok va se développer. On peut déjà charger nos téléphones au village grâce au groupe électrogène qui fournit l’électricité »

Quel est votre mot ou phrase favori dans votre langue et pourquoi?

« Le mot favori est  [meʃeʃərkey]   «  le fait d‘apprendre». Ce mot me plait car j’ai beaucoup appris avec l’arrivée de ce projet. A travers ce projet je comprends que même si l’on est déjà adulte, on peut apprendre de bonnes choses. »

Quelle a été la meilleure chose à propos de votre implication dans le projet d’ELDP?

 « Je peux déjà manipuler l’ordinateur alors qu’avant je n’ai jamais imaginé toucher à cet appareil magique »

Quels sont vos espoirs pour le devenir de votre langue

« Mon désir pour la langue cuvok est que celle-ci soit développée, avec un bon système d’écriture. Que ma langue soit connue dans le monde entier et d’autres personnes s’intéressent à ma langue pour avoir d’autres projets pour aider à nous développer »

A blacksmith carrying a pot of millet beer to pour after the burial ceremony of someone who died in the village

Interview d’ Amadou, Felix

Peux-tu brièvement parler de toi et de ta langue?

 « Je m’appelle Amadou Felix, né vers 1981 dans une famille polygame. J’ai fait des études jusqu’en 4 e année de l’enseignement technique. Je suis né dans le quartier Wampa à la frontière avec les gens qui parlent la langue Mofu. Je suis veuf et père de 2 enfants. »

Est-ce que votre langue est encore parlée par tout le monde dans la communauté?

 « Oui la langue cuvok est parlée mais il y a de mélange avec le fulfuldé, une langue que tout le monde parle dans notre région ainsi lorsque nous allons au marché, nous ne pouvons plus parler notre langue. »

Comment est-ce que ce projet de documentation de ta langue a commencé?

 « en 2014, le chef de village a fait appel à moi pour aider Ndokobai Dadak dans un travail sur la langue cuvok. Je pense qu’ils m’ont appelé car il est rare de trouver les gens qui ont été à l’école chez nous. Ainsi, lorsque j’ai été retenu dans le projet, Ndokobai Dadak nous a donné beaucoup de formation pour travailler avec l’ordinateur, utiliser les appareils photo et les enregistreurs de sons »

Peux-tu nous parler des personnes qui travaillent dans le projet

«Dans le projet, nous nous retrouvons chaque matin pour travailler avec les personnes suivantes : Ndokobai Dadak, Kawake paul, Kedjewe Jacob, moi-même,  Dabla Kebehey, Ltouteved Ezechiel, Tahbai pierre, Ngecmey, Ngoleng , Abdou Nasoudam, Mtsila , Kendele Jean Paul, Kamtsafa Meverkede, Kebehey Maslamta, Kusek Kezelmey, Tahbai Esaie , Kabai Robert.  Kendele jean Paul et  Ltouteved, sont souvent appelés à voyager jusqu’à Maroua pour travailler avec le linguiste dans la grande ville. »

 Quel type de formation avez –vous reçu en linguistique et dans le domaine de la documentation linguistique ?

« En linguistique, le linguiste m’a formé pour l’aider dans le dépouillement et  l’analyse des données. Je suis formé dans le domaine de la traduction de mot à mot. Je suis aussi formé pour utiliser l’ordinateur et faire entrer les données dans la machine  »

Que penses-tu de ce projet ?

« Je pense que  le projet Tchouvok va aider toute la communauté Tchouvok dans le domaine d’alphabétisation pour nous sortir de l’analphabétisme. »

Quel impact croyez-vous que ce projet va avoir / a eu sur la communauté ?

« Le projet a permis de changer les mentalités avec la publication des brochures sur le SIDA, le choléra et sur les pratiques agricoles. Je crois que ce projet va nous aider davantage pour mieux comprendre le monde »

Quel est votre mot ou phrase favori dans votre langue et pourquoi ?

«Mon mot favori est  [megweɗey]   «  le fait de parler ». Le mot-ci est mon favori car parce que parler c’est pouvoir exprimer ce que l’on ressent ou désire. »

Quelle a été la meilleure chose à propos de votre implication dans le projet d’ELDP?

« Ma meilleure chose  dans le projet c’est de pouvoir lire et écrire en ma langue à travers l’alphabétisation. Je peux aussi manipuler l’ordinateur et l’appareil photo.»

Quels sont vos espoirs pour le devenir de votre langue

« Mon espoir pour la langue cuvok c’est de voir tout le monde dans ma communauté puisse la lire et l’écrire»

Thank you, Dadak, Pierre, Ezechiel, and Felix! To learn more about this project and the Cuvok language, visit the ELAR catalogue at: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI663110

Community Member Bio: Simeon Angel Martínez Torres, Pech Community (Honduras)

Claudine Chamoreau is an ELDP grantee studying the Pech language of Honduras (ISO639-3:pay).  This highly endangered Chibchan language has around 300 speakers and is no longer spoken by young people.  In addition to producing a descriptive grammar, Claudine’s research aims to produce a large digital corpus including transcribed recordings of ceremonial speech and descriptions of cooking and medicinal practices.

Claudine has generously shared some rich snapshots of her work with this language community.  First up, a biography of one of her main language consultants, the teacher and language activist Simeon Angel Martínez Torres.

Working on the project with A. Martínez, C. Chamoreau and J. Hernández (2014)

Simeon Angel Martínez Torres was born on October 25, 1980, in the municipality of Culmí, Department of Olancho, in a small hamlet called El Naranjo. His father Don Hernan Martínez Escobar and his beloved mother Juana Hernandez Carolina had eight children, five girls and three boys. Angel learned to work while very young, as an agricultural labourer with his father. He entered primary school in 1990, where he was an outstanding student in all areas. His teachers were always his guides, and aroused his enthusiasm for teaching from his earliest youth; his teacher Roldan Lopez particularly encouraged him to enter that fine profession.

Claudine Chamoreau, Ángel Martínez, Juana Hernández, Danilo Lugo Mendoza, Nimer López García. Members of the project team working on Pesh dialectological comparison (2016)

Angel, determined to become a teacher, undertook various work activities in his teens to enter secondary education in 2000 at the “Encuentro” institute in the city of Catacamas Olancho. In 2003, he entered the “Matilde Córdova de Suazo” Mixed Normal School in the municipality of Trujillo, Department of Colón. In 2005, Angel achieved his greatest dream, becoming a primary education teacher. He encountered many difficulties, but his persistence was rewarded. He now has a degree in Basic Education, having graduated from the “Francisco Morazán” National Pedagogical University.

Ángel Martínez showing pictures in La Laguna (2015)

Angel belongs to an indigenous group, the Pesh. He knows a lot about the Pesh culture, and speaks the language of this group. In 2011 he met Dr. Claudine Chamoreau who was interested in working with the Pesh to learn more about their language and culture. In 2013 he began working on the Pesh language documentation project in order to create a body of documentation and information on this language and its culture. This is very important for him, as the Pesh language is in danger of extinction. He saw that the project was a good opportunity to affirm his culture and support the continued existence of his language. We now have positive results: we have recorded questionnaires, stories, and conversations, among other things, to add to the body of information that has been collected by the project over a three-year period.

Ángel Martínez (April 2012):

“Yes, understand that this is a crisis, a cultural crisis we are experiencing, we Pesh, as an ethnic group. There are many factors that influence the loss of culture, the loss of identity and speech – discrimination, religion, school. Our language is not accepted in public places, there is no government support for it, so parents do not want to speak their language to their children; all this is troubling.”

“This is our identification, 100 percent, because if I say I am Pesh, and I do not speak the language, practically there is no proof to make you believe that I am Pesh, because when I am in Trujillo, like anyone else, people can simply say ‘He is not Pesh.’ So, how am I going to identify myself? Through my tongue, the authentic language.”

To learn more about the Pesh language and community, visit Claudine’s deposit in the elar catalogue at: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI971076

 

A Day in the Field- Andrew Harvey

Andrew Harvey is an ELDP grantee documenting Gorwaa, (South-Cushitic, Afro-Asiatic), a previously undocumented language, spoken by approximately 15,000 individuals in Babati District, Manyara Region, Tanzania.

Elicitation with Ayi Raheli

 Please tell us a bit about where you are doing your fieldwork.

 The area where my fieldwork is being carried out has traditionally been inhabited by the people of the Gorwaa ethnic group.  Following an old regional convention, I often refer to this place as Gorwaaland.  Gorwaaland is a relatively small geographic area, but is incredibly diverse.  Located in the eastern branch of the Eastern Tanzanian Rift, Gorwaaland is a mix of dry scrubland, hilly miombo woodlands, wet riverine forest, and equatorial rainforest.  The entire area has rather violent geological history, and is marked by features like volcanic blast craters and lakes with no known outlets.  The area has probably been a crossroads for very different peoples since very deep time indeed.  All major language phyla of the African continent are represented in and around the Eastern Tanzanian Rift.

John Ma’u, at a Gorwaa-language Community focus-group

When did you arrive and when will you be leaving?

This period of fieldwork began in early September of this year, and is going to be quite short: only about three months.  The main goals this time are to check previously-collected material, to fill gaps relating to my thesis, and to delve deeper into the more complex grammatical patterns.  Hopefully I’ll also have enough time for the fun stuff: collecting traditional stories and songs, spending time in the hills and forests talking about trees, and eating winged termites with my host family.

Aakó Lagweén Goti, Dó Gwandú

Can you describe what a typical day in the field is like for you?

The entire Gorwaa-speaking area is witness to rapid change: paved roads and electricity are slowly creeping up the hillsides and into the remote villages.  Endabeg – the village where I live – is still quite rural.  Every day begins at 5:30AM, when the animals start to wake up.  Once the milk cow is fed and given water, the chickens are let out, and the other cows, goats, and sheep are out of the stable and being looked after in pasture, it’s a quick breakfast of tea and maybe a boiled egg or a kitumbua rice doughnut, and then off to meet one of my language consultants.  Yesterday, for example, I spent the day with two sisters who brought me through hilltop forests of bracystegia trees to a special place where fine potting clay can be dug. Using a small video camera and a voice recorder, I recorded as they explained the process involved in digging the clay, as well as the associated ritual taboos.  On the day you dig clay, you mustn’t apply oil to your body; when descending into the pit, you must be barefoot; when returning home, you mustn’t greet anyone you meet along the way.  We ate together at their home in the afternoon, and I recorded as they ground the clay and began forming it into a small pot.  There exists an extensive set of words used specifically for potting, and, with luck, many will have been represented in these recordings.  Days end back in Endabeg, inputting the day’s recordings and creating metadata.  Recording equipment is plugged into the solar battery to charge, and then it is time for bed.

Darbo Hheke, Yerotoni

What are you most looking forward to doing after returning from fieldwork?  Conversely, what will you miss most after completing your fieldwork?

The people who I live and work with every day are an incredibly important part of my research, and also, part of my life.  Watching consummate singer Aakó Bu’ú Saqwaré make bird snares from animal hair, hunting honey with bands of teenagers, long chats my Gorwaa mother Ayi Raheli – these are all the things that I miss the most when I leave.  These very personal feelings are mixed with the general dread shared by many documentarians of endangered languages.  With the passage of time, fewer and fewer people are speaking the Gorwaa language, and increasingly unable to comprehend the universe around which the language has evolved.  The mystic dialogue between the diviner and his tla/ee stones, the exquisitely-crafted sinika riddles meant to brighten the home with laughter at night, the rowdiest of manda drinking songs – all of these forms of expression are impoverished with the passage of time.  What I’m looking forward to the most once back in the UK will no doubt be the odd Gorwaa-language WhatsApp message, and the Skype call that begins in xáy!  And perhaps a hot shower too.

Taking a GPS point a Gitoorí

Thank you so much, Andrew! To learn more about Andrew’s research and the Gorwaa language, visit: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI1014224

 

Where in the World is ELAR: ELDP Yunnan Training

This week on the ELAR blog, Sophie Mu recaps the Endangered Language Documentation Project training in Yunnan, China. 

ELDP regularly runs in-country training courses targeting local scholars and language documenters. This year we had our first in-country training courses in Yuxi, China.

ELDP and our co-host Yuxi Normal University welcomed thirty successful applicants from all over China to participate in a two-week training in Yuxi, Yunnan from October 24th– November 4th. We were pleased to have participants working on documentation on many endangered languages in China, including those which have not been officially recognised by the Chinese government, such as Sadu and Xiandao.  The selected participants came from different backgrounds but with the same passion and devotion to language documentation. The participants were young researchers from universities in major Chinese cities, such as Guoling Chen, who had been working on documenting Miao rituals in Guizhou; teachers from borders like Legun Mu, whose work involves creating teaching materials for children living along the border line between China and Burma; and community members like Zhuoma, a Tibetan language activist who works to document her own language, Jiarong Tibetean, in Sichuan. For many of our participants, this event was their first opportunity to attend a language documentation training.

We were honoured to have six language consultants from Yuanjiang and Mengla whose languages are endangered and under-documented. We were also fortunate to have experts from different parts of the world who had had worked in China for many years, to join the training team. Throughout the training, all of our team members supported the trainees with their vast experience working on language documentation in China and practical knowledge of different linguistic tools.

Our morning seminars and lectures were run by Dr Katia Chirkova (semantics and lexicography, ELAN-FLEx-ELAN workflow); Dr Hilario de Sousa (Morphosyntax, FLEx); Ross Perlin (FLEx, Ethics); Dr Mandana Seyfeddinipur (multimodality of language use, video equipment, recording and theory, ELAN, grant writing); Felix Rau (ELAN, ELAN-FLEx-ELAN workflow, metadata with CMDI Maker); Jeremy Collins (documentation project); and Sophie Mu (language documentation, audio equipment and recording techniques).  Every afternoon, the participants were divided into five groups to work with their language consultant to practice the skills and tools they were taught in the morning, with two instructors’ help. In the evenings, the participants had a two hour slot to work with their team members, discuss their proposals with instructors and share their incredible experiences working in different communities.

During the last two days of the training, ELDP held half-day clinics to answer participants’ remaining questions and concerns. On the last day of the training, each of the five groups presented their mini documentation project.

The training received significant attention on local and national levels in China. Yuxi TV, Yunnan TV and Xinhua News aired interviews conducted with instructors, participants and the language consultants on TV, radio, websites and newspapers.

ELDP would like to express our gratitude to all language consultants, our Yuxi co-hosts, participants and instructors at the training. We are looking forward to seeing the proposed projects and our continued collaboration.

 

Project Profile: Documentation of the Beth Qustan Dialect of the Central Neo-Aramaic language, Turoyo

This week on the ELAR blog, Mikael Oez writes about his ELDP project on Turoyo, a Neo-Aramaic language spoken in south eastern Turkey.

 Can you give us some background on the language ecology in your area?

The Turoyo language of the mountainous region of Tur ‘Abdin (the mountain of worshippers), south eastern Turkey, is known to its indigenous speakers as ‘Surayt’ or ‘Turoyo’, that is, ‘the language of the Tur ‘Abdin’. It belongs to the Central Neo-Aramaic (CNA) language group. This group of languages is sometimes also referred to as North Western Neo-Aramaic (NWNA).

The Turoyo dialect of CNA was originally spoken by indigenous Christians who have lived in Tur ‘Abdin and the surrounding areas since the first centuries of the Christian era. By definition, as spoken or vernacular dialects they were not written down (until modern times), but conveyed orally from one generation to the next. Without written records, it is rather difficult to ascertain precisely how far back Turoyo has been spoken as a distinct language. With the recent recognition of the importance of oral dialects, scholars have now started to look for evidence of its chronicle use and the interaction and borrowing from other languages in its milieu, such as Syriac, Arabic, Turkish, Kurdish and Persian.

What is your research question and why did you choose it?

The project is designed to shed some light on establishing more precise boundaries between the dialects and on the dynamics of feature transition. This will introduce much needed fresh material to boost discussion about the mechanisms of interaction between languages, such as lexical borrowing and externally induced grammar. For instance, villages with better links and nearer to the city of Midyat, the main urban centre, are often more influenced by the Arabic language, and Arabic words are often Aramaicised in Turoyo, i.e. they take an Aramaic pattern when they are conjugated, whereas villages borrow from their neighbouring Kurds, and hence Aramaicise Kurdish words. The Aramaicising of loan words is particularly interesting when they are verbs as they match the endings of the native words when they are conjugated.

Can you tell us more about the content of your deposit?

This project aims to record tales about Muslim visitations to the shrines of Christian saints, old wives’ tales and supernatural legends, such as the telling of djinn stories amongst Christians, and stories of magical practices. In doing so, this project will provide records of interaction between Muslim and Christian communities, and record invaluable vernacular data for which there are no written material. The recordings will also address aspects of daily life such as procedural texts, instructions, directions, interactions, discussion, negotiations, and informal talks.

I was slightly concerned about these topics, as people often shy away from these topics since they mostly fall into mysticism. However, I was very surprised about the hospitality and the openness of my consultants. They were very happy to pass on their invaluable experience, which I believe would have been lost if it were not recorded.

One of the recordings I thoroughly enjoyed was when I requested three generous ladies to cook cultural food, to be part of my procedural texts. To my surprise I realised how sophisticated the culinary art is in daily foods in Tur ‘Abdin. I can still feel the delicious taste of that original food in my taste buds.

p1000510

p1000508

p1000503

What’s been a challenge in this project and why?

I originally intended to travel to the Beth Qustan village in Tur ‘Abdin to conduct my fieldwork. However, due to the unstable political situation, I decided to change my location, and instead conducted my project in Germany within a diaspora speaker community. This meant I had to conduct much searching, coordination, and a careful selection of the displaced native speakers. I initially began working with people in their 80s. This made me realise that we had already lost the knowledge accumulated by octogenarians, as they found it much harder to remember things, and to talk in details about their culture. I immediately changed the focus of the project to a later generation, (speakers aged 55-65).

What still needs to be done?

There are at least a couple of dozen Neo-Aramaic dialects originated from Tur ‘Abdin, which have not yet been documented. I realised during my fieldwork that if these are not documented before losing the generation of native speakers I worked with, this is to say, in five to ten years, we will also lose all invaluable knowledge about their culture and traditions. The Aramaic civilisation goes back more than 3000 years, which we have not preserved. We have the technology and equipment today to capture this fascinating civilisation at a very low cost. The only thing we don’t have on our side is time.

p1000575

Thank you, Mikael! You can see Mikael’s deposit at: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI1035085

 

 

Reasons you should use video in language documentation

At CoLang this year I was invited to come and talk with the group in the Recording and using video in language documentation class. I shared some of my favourite reasons why I always try to use video in a language documentation project, which gave me a chance to mention some of my favourite research on gesture, and talk to people about their experiences with filming. I thought I’d write up four of my favourite reasons for filming video in this post. If you’re thinking of doing a language documentation project I’ve also written a paragraph at the end of this that you can use in the first draft of a grant application.

Gesture is an important part of communication

Gesture and speech work together. It’s often much easier to understand the size or shape of an object if someone is gesturing while talking about it. You also don’t want to spend hours listening to people saying ‘when you weave this bit goes around that bit and then these are connected’. You know that those gestures are illustrating the point being made, but without seeing them you’re loosing all the important information.

Gesture is an important part of cognition

Psycholinguists will tell you that gesture and speech are deeply integrated in your brain. We know this because sometimes the speech and the gesture refer to the same thing, or reflect different perspectives on the one topic. Other times, gestures will give us an insight into someone’s thoughts even though there is no linguistic evidence for what is happening. Next time you watch an English speaker talking about things coming up in the next few days, look at what they are doing with their hands. If they’re gesturing, It’s likely they are ordering those events with the soonest on their left and the later events on their right. That’s because English speakers tend to order events from left to right, which is a reflection of our writing system. Even though there’s no spoken evidence for this cognitive habit, there is gestural evidence. Other languages may have other metaphors for how they order time or events, which might influence the gestures that they use. Aymara (South America) speakers, for example, gesture with the future behind them.

Gesture is an important part of culture

All humans gesture, but different cultures gesture differently. I’ve written about the nose-tap gesture, which is common to the UK, Italy and France. Similarly,  recognising the ‘up yours’ gesture as offensive depends on whether you’re from the USA or the UK. It’s not just these symbolic gestures that are culturally acquired. The shape of your hand when you point at things, varies across cultures. Some cultures don’t point with the left hand, and others don’t even point with the hand at all; Nick Enfield showed for Lao that pointing with the lips is a common strategy.

tumblr_inline_o9jnzxp3z11qhe5f0_400

It’s not that we can’t point with our lips – maybe you do when your hands are full – but it’s not common.

People like to look at things

As a selfish reason to collect video, it makes transcription much easier, because you have additional visual cues, and all that additional content (see point one). Video also contains a lot of incidental information about how people dress, and what their daily environment is like. It also means when it comes time to share materials with participants and community organisations, you can share videos, which are far more interesting than just audio files. I had always thought this was good, but I got confirmation on my most recent visit to Nepal. On the day we were recording with Norpu, the village Shaman, he told us he was so pleased we were recording people and making a visual record. He regrets that he does not have a single photograph of his mother, who died 20 years ago.

Let me preempt some problems with video

All of this presumes that you’re working in a community where people are ok with digital representations of their images and voices. It also presumes that you’re working in genres that are appropriate to film, and have met basic IRB/ethics requirements. I also presume you’ve discussed sharing and permissions with the community, and the individuals you are recording with. This may restrict some of the genres or topics that can be recorded with video, or different videos may have different ‘access permissions’ (e.g. some videos may be open to any audience, while only the community members and researchers may be able to access others). I know some people who say that if you’re not given the right to film video then a project is not worth the time. I don’t entirely agree with that, but it will be a diminished set of outputs with only audio.

Some people don’t like to work with video because it takes more effort to set up than just an audio mic. That’s true – but an audio mic takes more effort to set up than just sitting at home, and when you’ve already driven through 8 hours of desert, or flown to another country, it’s not *that* much more effort. Other people find video too obtrusive. My feeling is that setting up any recording situation is obtrusive (provided it meets ethical requirements and you’ve discussed it with participants). I find that being comfortable with your equipment and making people feel comfortable with your presence mitigates many of those problems. Practice setting up as many times as you can before you begin the project. Record your friends and family. I now know my gear well enough now to continue chatting throughout the setup. I’ve also had a lot of luck training a younger member of the Syuba community to help me with these sessions, which puts people at ease (particularly me).

Some people will worry that video takes up too much storage space. Make sure you test how much space that video takes up, and budget for a situation where you record even more than you expect, as people can get enthusiastic once you’re on a roll. Talking to archives early in the project planning to establish what they can take will also help you avoid problems down the line.

Here’s a project paragraph for you

This project uses both video and audio recording. This is to ensure that the data is the most useful it can be in the long term for both linguistic analysis and community sharing. Having video as well as audio makes transcription easier, and ensures that the elements of discourse that are not in the spoken channel are still collected. Both the audio and video equipment record in high-quality lossless formats suitable for archiving. I have budgeted for archiving as quoted by <insert archive name> and ensured that I have sufficient local storage for adequate backup.

By Lauren Gawne

This content originally appeared on Superlinguo at http://www.superlinguo.com/post/148949834781/reasons-you-should-use-video-in-language

ELDP Project Highlight: Documentation of Northern Alta, a Philippine Negrito Language

This week on the ELAR blog, Alexandro Garcia-Laguia shares a look into his ELDP project. Alexandro is researching Northern Alta, an endangered language spoken along the rivers of Aurora province in the Philippines.

Reconstructing an old Alta song

The speakers of Alta have reported that their parents did not teach them any songs in Alta (n_alta054.42). However, one day, at a gathering with six women in Barangay Dianed, the ladies recalled fragments of an Alta song. They decided to sit down and collaborate to write and complete the lyrics. We recorded them singing the song twice (and the recordings of the song, the transcription and other relevant files have been uploaded to the Endangered Languages Archive as session 45: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI1032028).

Subsequently Joaquin Ramón, a composer from Spain, created a backing track for the song with the piano, so the Alta can sing the song whenever they want and teach it to the children. Karaoke is appreciated in the communities and in the Philippines in general, and is often used as way of having fun on weekends, so we expect the recording to be used in the future.

The recording of this backing track is included in the session 45 file (nalta45_piano) and has also been uploaded to the cloud and: https://soundcloud.com/alexfbmv/nalta045-piano.

alex_1

Writing the lyrics of the Alta song (Dianed, January 2014)

alex_2

Recording the song

The non-Alta speakers of Alta

Given the small number of speakers of Alta – estimations go from 200 to 300 persons – those who are not Alta but speak the language are rare, but do exist. The corpus includes a number of recordings of four different speakers of the language who are not ethnically Alta. Some of them have a surprising command of the language. This is the case of Inelda Andon, who states “I am not an Alta, he is the Alta here, but I learned the language when I was a kid. When I was four we started living with the Alta, thus, even if we do not have curly hair, even if we are not Alta, we can speak the Alta language” (session 60).

During a series of transcription sessions, native speaker Violeta Fernandez, who was slowly repeating the recordings we had made of the language, would confidently point and substitute Tagalog borrowings with the native Alta word. Surprisingly, whenever she could not remember the Alta word, she would ask Inelda, who was in the garden but could listen to what we were transcribing. Several times, Inelda Andon provided the corresponding Alta word.

alex_3

Inelda and her husband Antonio Andon at Diteki (February 2015)

Other non-native speakers have learned the language, either because they grew up with Alta neighbors, or because they are married to an Alta. In recording session 40 (How I learned Alta) Rogelio Ganarrial, who is the second husband of the barangay chieftain and native Alta speaker Erlinda Ganarrial, describes his experiences with the language. In two other recordings (41 and 42), Mila Lasam explains how she learned the language and how her daily life is at the coastal barangay Dianed. Finally, Conchita Genes, originally from Dibut (an isolated coastal area where Umiray Dumaget Agta, another Negrito language, is spoken), says she left her village when she was a child and does not remember anything of it. Conchita grew up in Diteki with the Alta and is now married to Renato Genes, a native Alta with whom she speaks the language on a daily basis. She has participated actively in the project (see recordings 81, 88, 90 and 93).

Given the circumstances in which the Alta are sometimes mocked because of their curly hair or the way their language sounds, the non­-Alta speakers of the language are an example of tolerance for the community.

Thank you, Alexandro!

See Alexandro’s deposit here: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI1032028