Can communicative practices help ‘vulnerable’ communities in times of change?

By Dounia Mahlouly|May 25, 2020|Latest news, Research, The Middle East|0 comments

Philosopher Martha Nussbaum once wrote that playful storytelling “teaches people to be capable of living with others without control; [and] connects experiences of vulnerability and surprise to curiosity and wonder, rather than to crippling anxiety” (2010, p. 101). Her work on vulnerability has helped critical communication scholars shift their focus away from the structural power of media, which has been overstudied, to organic and informal communication practices that can enable

Read More

Covid-19: Is the medium the message?

By Dina Matar|March 27, 2020|Latest news|0 comments

The medium is the message? Dina Matar, CGMC The Covid-19 outbreak on an unprecedented global level has further embedded media – as news institutions, as information providers, as spaces for socialisation and as technologies of power – in people’s lives in ways never witnessed before. With information vying with misinformation in the virtual “war against the virus”, news media corporations have reported a monumental rise in traffic as people concerned

Read More

Mark Hobart reflects on Media and Metaphors during COVID-19

By Dina Matar|March 27, 2020|Latest news|0 comments

Mark Hobart, Professor Emeritus, Centre for Global Media and Communication The Covid-19 pandemic has had politicians, the mass and social media reaching for their metaphors. ‘We are at war’, French President Emmanuel Macron declared in a television interview. US President Donald Trump declared himself a ‘wartime president’. Not to be outdone, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson invoked Churchill’s Second World War speeches to declaim the virus a deadly enemy. The

Read More

CNN theory and the humanitarian crisis in Syria? unanswered questions

By Dina Matar|February 24, 2020|Latest news, Media and Syrian conflict, The Middle East|0 comments

Dina Matar, Centre for Global Media and Communication, School of Interdisciplinary Studies The war in Syria that has now been going on for nine years has produced ‘the biggest humanitarian horror story of the 21st Century’ according to the UN’s Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Mark Lowcock. However, it is not a horror story, but a terrifying actuality, the latest chapter played out since December 2019 in Idlib, the last stronghold

Read More

A dip in popularity forces Iranian leaders to readjust rhetoric

By Saeed Zeydabadi-Nejad|February 20, 2020|Latest news, The Middle East|0 comments

Dr Massoumeh Torfeh explores the upcoming parliametary elections in Iran on TRT: Link Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, Research Associate LSE and SOAS focusing on Iran & AFG. Ex-UN Director of Communication AFG, BBC journalist. Book: BBC & Iran-UK relations. PhD Pol Science LSE. Image credit: “Iran reportage MO*” by MO* is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0  

Media and the Coronavirus—business as usual

By Dina Matar|February 12, 2020|Latest news|0 comments

Dina Matar Centre for Global Media and Communication, SOAS Media reporting of the spread coronavirus in China and elsewhere has underlined their role in normalizing a familiar Western narrative of a dreadful threat from outside. Much of the coverage particularly in Western news media, has framed the issue in the language of concern, anxiety and plain fear. Inevitably it is accompanied by imagery of lockdowns, seclusion, isolation and containment –

Read More

Dr. Zahera Harb discusses fake news and the Lebanese protests

By Dina Matar|November 11, 2019|Arab uprisings, Latest news, Social media, The Middle East|0 comments

Lebanon Protests and ‘fake news’ By Zahera Harb On October 17 a wave of protests erupted in Lebanon against corruption. Almost half of the Lebanese population took to the streets demanding an end to corruption, transparent economic policies, social justice and protection of the environment. Slogans, such as ‘down with the sectarian confessional regime,’ mingled with calls for the resignation of all state officials whose practices were regarded as corrupt

Read More